Company C Contemporary Ballet | Charles Anderson Artistic Director
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Charles Anderson - Artistic Director
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Charles Anderson - Artistic Director

Charles Anderson danced with the New York City Ballet from 1985-93, performing works of George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Peter Martins and many other notable choreographers. The son of two accomplished dancers, San Francisco Ballet Principal David Anderson and Soloist Zola Dishong, Anderson began studying dance at an early age and later trained at and received full scholarships to the San Francisco Ballet School, the Joffrey Ballet School, the American Ballet Theatre School and the School of American Ballet. He joined New York City Ballet at the age of 20.

Anderson began choreographing ballets while still a dancer with the New York City Ballet. From 1990-1994, he co-founded and acted as artistic director for Ballet, Inc. in New York, where he choreographed many of his early works. Anderson’s work reflects a blend of classical and contemporary influences and is included in the repertories of professional dance companies throughout the country. Anderson founded Company C Contemporary Ballet in 2002.

Charles Anderson is a prominent ballet teacher in the Bay Area and has been a guest teacher for Smuin Ballet, Matthew Bourne, Oakland Ballet, Twyla Tharp Dance, Hubbard Street Dance, the North Carolina School of the Arts and the Henny Jurriëns Foundation in Amsterdam. In addition to his work as a dancer, choreographer and teacher, Anderson has served on the board of governors for the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA), created costumes for the New York City Ballet’s Diamond Project, been an adjudicator and instructor for the Bob Fosse Scholarship Program and served as a panelist for the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Grant.

Company C Contemporary Ballet

P.O. Box 23262
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523

925.708.0752
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Company C Contemporary Ballet. Alexandre Proia's A World to Come. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor, 2012.

Photo by Rosalie O’Connor